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Breaking Barriers

Breaking ice (cracks in the ice)

In a society where competence is often equated with capability, individuals with disabilities face a unique challenge: the burden of perceived incompetence. This misguided perception not only undermines our potential but also significantly hampers our progress in educational institutions and the workforce, not to mention civic and community involvement.

 

Schools should ideally be a haven for learning and growth, yet they can become hotbeds for reinforcing misconceptions about capability. When educators, knowingly or unknowingly, subscribe to the notion that a person with a disability is inherently less capable, they inadvertently perpetuate a damaging cycle. This perception can lead to lowered expectations, reduced opportunities, and a lack of appropriate support, ultimately impeding the growth, potential, and inclusion of these individuals.

 

The impact extends far beyond the school years. Transitioning into the workforce can be an even greater challenge. Employers influenced by societal biases may harbor reservations about hiring individuals with disabilities, assuming their perceived incompetence will hinder productivity. This prejudiced lens prevents them from recognizing the unique skills, talents, and potential contributions that these individuals can bring to the table.

 

Moreover, this perceived incompetence can manifest in several ways:

 

Individuals with disabilities might be overlooked for roles or tasks that match their abilities. This underestimation leads to missed opportunities for both personal and professional development.

The presumption of incompetence often denies individuals with disabilities access to training and advancement opportunities, limiting their potential for career growth.

Psychologically, constantly being perceived as incompetent takes a toll on one's self-esteem and mental health. The internalization of these negative perceptions can create a barrier to personal development and success.

In addition to the challenges individuals with disabilities face in education and the workforce, the impact of perceived incompetence further extends to their exclusion from tables of power and influence within society. The prejudiced notion that individuals with disabilities are inherently less capable can result in their exclusion from decision-making processes, limiting their representation in influential roles.

 

Communal involvement is a crucial aspect of societal inclusion, and the perceived incompetence associated with disabilities often acts as a barrier to full participation. When individuals are discounted merely based on the knowledge of their disability, it perpetuates a cycle of exclusion from community activities, events, and decision-making forums.

 

For a truly inclusive society, it is imperative to recognize the diverse abilities and strengths that individuals with disabilities bring to the communal table. By challenging and dispelling misconceptions about incompetence, communities can create spaces that embrace the contributions of every member, fostering a sense of belonging and shared responsibility.

 

Communal involvement goes beyond education and the workplace; it encompasses participation in civic activities, community events, and leadership roles. When individuals with disabilities are excluded from these spheres due to perceived incompetence, it not only hampers their personal development but also deprives the community of valuable perspectives and talents.

 

To break down these barriers, community leaders, organizers, and members must actively work towards creating an inclusive environment. This involves promoting awareness, challenging stereotypes, and ensuring that individuals with disabilities have equal access to community resources and opportunities.

 

The narrative shift towards recognizing competence in diverse forms should extend to all facets of society, including community engagement. It requires a collective effort to dismantle stereotypes and create a community where everyone, regardless of ability, is recognized for their unique contributions. By doing so, we pave the way for a more just, equitable, and inclusive society that values the participation and influence of all its members.

 

Empowering individuals with disabilities starts with a collective shift in societal attitudes, acknowledging that competence comes in diverse forms, and disability does not equate to inability. It demands a commitment to providing equal opportunities and breaking down barriers that hinder the progress of these individuals.

 

Education and awareness play pivotal roles in changing societal perceptions. Schools need to implement inclusive education practices that promote the abilities and strengths of all students. Educators must be trained to recognize and nurture the potential in every individual, irrespective of their disabilities.

 

In the professional sphere, companies can embrace diversity and inclusivity by implementing inclusive hiring practices and creating supportive work environments. Encouraging open dialogue, providing reasonable accommodations, and focusing on abilities rather than limitations can foster an atmosphere where individuals with disabilities thrive and contribute meaningfully.

 

It is crucial to debunk the myth of incompetence associated with disabilities and instead focus on the concept of 'differential abilities.' Every individual, regardless of their abilities, possesses a unique set of skills and strengths. By fostering an environment that acknowledges and celebrates these diverse strengths, we can break the cycle of perceived incompetence.

 

The narrative shift towards recognizing competence in diverse forms should extend to all facets of society, including community engagement. It requires a collective effort to dismantle stereotypes and create a community where everyone, regardless of ability, is recognized for their unique contributions. By doing so, we pave the way for a more just, equitable, and inclusive society that values the participation and influence of all its members. Let's cultivate an environment where considering competence first is the norm, and where the potential of every individual is afforded the opportunity to thrive.


-Michelle Friedman





Michelle Friedman is the board chair of Keshet in Chicago, a member of Disability Lead and has been a disability advocate for 40 years. She has written two children’s books and is a frequent speaker for elementary and high school-age students.

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